Feb. 22nd, 2017

From Rome and back:
  • I am amateurish if you like: I do not think that all the universe is straining towards the obscure significance of your pictures.
  • After all, the true seeing is within; and painting stares at you with an insistent imperfection.
  • There are characters which are continually creating collisions and nodes for themselves in dramas which nobody is prepared to act with them.
  • now been five weeks in Rome, and in the kindly mornings when autumn and winter seemed to go hand in hand like a happy aged couple one of whom would presently survive in chiller loneliness
  • whose ardent nature turned all her small allowance of knowledge into principles
  • ceilings; the long vistas of white forms whose marble eyes seemed to hold the monotonous light of an alien world: all this vast wreck of ambitious ideals, sensuous and spiritual, mixed confusedly with the signs of breathing forgetfulness and degradation
  • the vastness of St. Peter's, the huge bronze canopy, the excited intention in the attitudes and garments of the prophets and evangelists in the mosaics above, and the red drapery which was being hung for Christmas spreading itself everywhere like a disease of the retina.
  • we do not expect people to be deeply moved by what is not unusual. That element of tragedy
  • If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence.
  • The large vistas and wide fresh air which she had dreamed of finding in her husband's mind were replaced by anterooms and winding passages
  • There is hardly any contact more depressing to a young ardent creature than that of a mind in which years full of knowledge seem to have issued in a blank absence of interest or sympathy.
  • Having made his clerical toilet with due care in the morning, he was prepared only for those amenities of life which were suited to the well-adjusted stiff cravat of the period, and to a mind weighted with unpublished matter.
  • about as important as the surplus stock of false antiquities
  • There is a sort of jealousy which needs very little fire: it is hardly a passion, but a blight bred in the cloudy, damp despondency of uneasy egoism.
  • We are all of us born in moral stupidity, taking the world as an udder to feed our supreme selves:
  • its sadness would have been winged with hope. No nature could be less suspicious
  • Ladislaw--I think it is perfect so far." Will vented those adjuring interjections which imply that admiration is too strong for syntax; and Naumann said in a tone of piteous regret-- "Ah--now--if I could but have had more--but you have other engagements-- I could not ask it--or even to come again to-morrow."
  • many things," said Dorothea, simply. "I should like to make life beautiful--I mean everybody's life. And then all this immense expense of art, that seems somehow to lie outside life and make it no better for the world, pains one. It spoils my enjoyment of anything when I am made to think that most people are shut out from it." "I call that the fanaticism of sympathy," said Will, impetuously.
  • And enjoyment radiates. It is of no use to try and take care of all the world; that is being taken care of when you feel delight-- in art or in anything else.
  • variety on the chords of emotion--a soul in which knowledge passes instantaneously into feeling, and feeling flashes back as a new organ of knowledge. One may have that condition by fits only." "But you leave out the poems," said Dorothea. "I think they are wanted to complete the poet.
My favorite persons in the book are the Garth:
  • agreeable young gentleman. With a favor to ask we review our list of friends, do justice to their more amiable qualities, forgive their little offenses, and concerning each in turn, try to arrive at the conclusion that he will be eager to oblige us, our own eagerness to be obliged being as communicable as other warmth.
  • If he had to blame any one, it was necessary for him to move all the papers within his reach, or describe various diagrams with his stick, or make calculations with the odd money in his pocket, before he could begin; and he would rather do other men's work than find fault with their doing. I fear he was a bad disciplinarian.
  • With regard to horses, distrust was your only clew. But scepticism, as we know, can never be thoroughly applied, else life would come to a standstill: something we must believe in and do, and whatever that something may be called, it is virtually our own judgment, even when it seems like the most slavish reliance on another.
  • "The theatre of all my actions is fallen," said an antique personage when his chief friend was dead; and they are fortunate who get a theatre where the audience demands their best.
  • Certainly, the exemplary Mrs. Garth had her droll aspects, but her character sustained her oddities, as a very fine wine sustains a flavor of skin.
  • Looking at the mother, you might hope that the daughter would become like her, which is a prospective advantage equal to a dowry--the mother too often standing behind the daughter like a malignant prophecy-- "Such as I am, she will shortly be."
  • "Yes, ultimately," said Mrs. Garth, who having a special dislike to fine words on ugly occasions
  • the felling and lading of timber, and the huge trunk vibrating star-like in the distance along the highway, the crane at work on the wharf, the piled-up produce in warehouses, the precision and variety of muscular effort wherever exact work had to be turned out,--all these sights of his youth had acted on him as poetry without the aid of the poets.
  • But there was no spirit of denial in Caleb, and the world seemed so wondrous to him that he was ready to accept any number of systems, like any number of firmaments, if they did not obviously interfere with the best land-drainage, solid building,
  • how can you bear to be fit for nothing in the world that is useful?
  • finally he turned his eyes on his daughter--"a woman, let her be as good as she may, has got to put up with the life her husband makes for her. Your mother has had to put up with a good deal because of me."
Marriage and inheritance. The twin pillars of Victorian fiction.
  • brandy was the best thing against infection. "I shall drink brandy," added Mr. Vincy, emphatically--as much as to say, this was not an occasion for firing with blank-cartridges.
  • will be minutely and multitudinously scratched in all directions; but place now against it a lighted candle as a centre of illumination, and lo! the scratches will seem to arrange themselves in a fine series of concentric circles round that little sun. It is demonstrable that the scratches are going everywhere impartially and it is only your candle which produces the flattering illusion of a concentric arrangement, its light falling with an exclusive optical selection. These things are a parable. The scratches are events, and the candle is the egoism of any person now absent--
  • falsehoods, and if her statements were no direct clew to fact, why, they were not intended in that light-- they were among her elegant accomplishments, intended to please.
  • his chin had too vanishing an aspect, looking as if it were being gradually reabsorbed.
  • and ideas, we know, tend to a more solid kind of existence, the necessary materials being at hand.
  • "Mrs. Cadwallader says it is nonsense, people going a long journey when they are married. She says they get tired to death of each other, and can't quarrel comfortably, as they would at home.
  • but why always Dorothea? Was her point of view the only possible one with regard to this marriage? I protest against all our interest, all our effort at understanding being given to the young skins that look blooming in spite of trouble; for these too will get faded
  • Society never made the preposterous demand that a man should think as much about his own qualifications for making a charming girl happy as he thinks of hers for making himself happy. As if a man could choose not only his wife hut his wife's husband!
  • it was that proud narrow sensitiveness which has not mass enough to spare for transformation into sympathy, and quivers thread-like in small currents of self-preoccupation
  • spectacle of life and never to be liberated from a small hungry shivering self-- never to be fully possessed by the glory we behold, never to have our consciousness rapturously transformed into the vividness of a thought, the ardor of a passion, the energy of an action
  • "Why do you attribute to me a wish for anything that would annoy you? You speak to me as if I were something you had to contend against. Wait at least till I appear to consult my own pleasure apart from yours."
  • appeal--this cry from soul to soul, without other consciousness than their moving with kindred natures in the same embroiled medium, the same troublous fitfully illuminated life.
  • Mrs Bulstrode's eyes, which were rather fine, rolled round that ample quilled circuit, while she spoke. "I have just heard something about you that has surprised me very much, Rosamond." "What is that, aunt?" Rosamond's eyes also were roaming over her aunt's large embroidered collar.
  • She felt that she had spoken as impressively as it was necessary to do, and that in using the superior word "militate" she had thrown a noble drapery over a mass of particulars which were still evident enough.
  • There are many wonderful mixtures in the world which are all alike called love, and claim the privileges of a sublime rage which is an apology for everything (in literature and the drama).
  • That moment of naturalness was the crystallizing feather-touch: it shook flirtation into love.
  • The right word is always a power, and communicates its definiteness to our action.
  • Tom looked at his legs, but left it uncertain whether he preferred his moral advantages to a more vicious length of limb and reprehensible gentility of trouser.
  • here her voice broke under the touching thought which she was attributing to her speechless brother; the mention of ourselves being naturally affecting.
  • in a soft tone of humility, in which he had a sense of luxurious cunning
  • And she had already come to take life very much as a comedy in which she had a proud, nay, a generous resolution not to act the mean or treacherous part. Mary might have become cynical
  • not a blood-relation, but of that generally objectionable class called wife's kin.
  • When I married Humphrey I made up my mind to like sermons, and I set out by liking the end very much. That soon spread to the middle and the beginning, because I couldn't have the end without them."
  • "But I am not taking it in that light. I can't wear my solemnity too often, else it will go to rags.
  • When the animals entered the Ark in pairs, one may imagine that allied species made much private remark on each other, and were tempted to think that so many forms feeding on the same store of fodder were eminently superfluous, as tending to diminish the rations.
  • with a determination not to show anything so compromising to a man of ability as wonder or surprise.

Profile

fiefoe

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2 3 45678
9 101112131415
16 171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Page Summary

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 25th, 2017 08:32 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios