Feb. 21st, 2017

Onto Lydgate and Rosamond:
  • said the Rector's wife, much too well-born not to be an amateur in medicine.
  • a charming woman, not so quick as to nullify the pleasure of explanation.
  • "she ought to produce the effect of exquisite music." Plain women he regarded as he did the other severe facts of life, to be faced with philosophy and investigated by science. But Rosamond Vincy seemed to have the true melodic charm
  • Destiny stands by sarcastic with our dramatis personae folded in her hand.
  • while a few personages or families that stood with rocky firmness amid all this fluctuation, were slowly presenting new aspects in spite of solidity, and altering with the double change of self and beholder.
  • But on this side too there was a cheering sense of money;
  • But a prig is a fellow who is always making you a present of his opinions."
  • "And if that's to be it, what has it pleased the Almighty to make families for?" Here Mrs. Waule's tears fell, but with moderation.
  • property was gone out of the family? The human mind has at no period accepted a moral chaos; and so preposterous a result was not strictly conceivable. But we are frightened at much that is not strictly conceivable.
  • antithesis, that she had all the virtues. Plainness has its peculiar temptations and vices quite as much as beauty; it is apt either to feign amiability, or, not feigning it, to show all the repulsiveness of discontent:
  • "My liking always wants some little kindness to kindle it. I am not magnanimous enough to like people who speak to me without seeming to see me."
  • she even acted her own character, and so well, that she did not know it to be precisely her own.
  • The difficult task of knowing another soul is not for young gentlemen whose consciousness is chiefly made up of their own wishes.
  • About his ordinary bearing there was a certain fling, a fearless expectation of success, a confidence in his own powers and integrity much fortified by contempt for petty obstacles or seductions of which he had had no experience.
  • he certainly liked him the better, as Rosamond did, for being a stranger in Middlemarch. One can begin so many things with a new person!
  • It's a good British feeling to try and raise your family a little:
  • "It's this sort of thing---this tyrannical spirit, wanting to play bishop and banker everywhere--it's this sort of thing makes a man's name stink."
  • But a full-fed fountain will be generous with its waters even in the rain, when they are worse than useless; and a fine fount of admonition is apt to be equally irrepressible.
  • What can the fitness of things mean, if not their fitness to a man's expectations? Failing this, absurdity and atheism gape behind him.
  • had of course left him free to read the indecent passages in the school classics, but beyond a general sense of secrecy and obscenity in connection with his internal structure, had left his imagination quite unbiassed, so that for anything he knew his brains lay in small bags at his temples, and he had no more thought of representing to himself how his blood circulated than how paper served instead of gold.
  • the world was made new to him by a presentiment of endless processes filling the vast spaces planked out of his sight by that wordy ignorance which he had supposed to be knowledge.
  • The story of their coming to be shapen after the average and fit to be packed by the gross, is hardly ever told even in their consciousness; for perhaps their ardor in generous unpaid toil cooled as imperceptibly as the ardor of other youthful loves, till one day their earlier self walked like a ghost in its old home and made the new furniture ghastly.
  • in spite of venerable colleges which used great efforts to secure purity of knowledge by making it scarce
  • that a change in the units was the most direct mode of changing the numbers.
  • him a title to everlasting fame: each of them had his little local personal history sprinkled with small temptations and sordid cares, which made the retarding friction of his course towards final companionship with the immortals.
  • for character too is a process and an unfolding. The man was still in the making,
  • one's self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated.
  • This was one of the difficulties of moving in good Middlemarch society: it was dangerous to insist on knowledge as a qualification for any salaried office.
  • Rosamond could say the right thing; for she was clever with that sort of cleverness which catches every tone except the humorous.
  • gave forth his large rendering of noble music with the precision of an echo. It was almost startling, heard for the first time. A hidden soul seemed to be flowing forth from Rosamond's fingers; and so indeed it was, since souls live on in perpetual echoes, and to all fine expression there goes somewhere an originating activity, if it be only that of an interpreter.
  • that feminine radiance, that distinctive womanhood which must be classed with flowers and music, that sort of beauty which by its very nature was virtuous, being moulded only for pure and delicate joys.
  • Our passions do not live apart in locked chambers, but, dressed in their small wardrobe of notions, bring their provisions to a common table and mess together, feeding out of the common store according to their appetite.
  • Mr. Farebrother, quite unaffectedly. "I don't translate my own convenience into other people's duties."
  • made his character resemble those southern landscapes which seem divided between natural grandeur and social slovenliness
  • For the first time Lydgate was feeling the hampering threadlike pressure of small social conditions, and their frustrating complexity.
  • Dr. Sprague was superfluously tall; his trousers got creased at the knees, and showed an excess of boot at a time when straps seemed necessary to any dignity of bearing; you heard him go in and out, and up and down, as if he had come to see after the roofing.
  • at which everybody turned away from Mr. Hackbutt, leaving him to feel the uselessness of superior gifts in Middlemarch.
  • Romanticism, which has helped to fill some dull blanks with love and knowledge, had not yet penetrated the times with its leaven and entered into everybody's food;
__ "Chrysal, or the Adventures of a Guinea,"
__ Her favorite poem was "Lalla Rookh."

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